2016-2017 Seasonal Flu

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This is the Chatham County Public Health Department page for seasonal flu.

  • Click here for Seasonal Vaccine Information Sheets
  • Click here for Seasonal Flu Frequently Asked Questions
  • Click here for Prevention and Treatment
  • Click here for Additional Resources

Beginning October 1, 2016, we will be offering flu vaccine at the Chatham County Public Health Department clinic in Siler City. To schedule an appointment, please call 919-742-5641. 

The Health Department accepts and will bill most insurances. If no insurance, a fee of $30.00 for the injectable vaccine is due the day of service.


Seasonal Flu Vaccine Information Sheets

  • Seasonal Flu Shot Vaccine Information Sheet- English  Spanish
  • Seasonal Flu Intranasal Spray Vaccine Information Sheet- English Spanish


Seasonal Flu Frequently Asked Questions

What is seasonal influenza (flu)?

Seasonal influenza, commonly called "the flu," is caused by influenza viruses, which infect the respiratory tract (i.e., the nose, throat, lungs). Unlike many other viral respiratory infections, such as the common cold, the flu can cause severe illness and life-threatening complications in many people. In the United States, on average 5% to 20% of the population gets the flu; more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from seasonal flu-related complications, and; about 36,000 people die from seasonal flu-related causes.

What are symptoms of the flu?

Influenza is a respiratory illness. Symptoms of the flu include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people may also have vomiting and diarrhea.

When is the flu season in the United States?

In the United States, the peak of flu season has occurred anywhere from late November through March.

How does the flu spread?

The main way that influenza viruses are thought to spread is from person to person in respiratory droplets of coughs and sneezes. (This is called "droplet spread.") This can happen when droplets from a cough or sneeze of an infected person are propelled (generally up to 3 feet) through the air and deposited on the mouth or nose of people nearby. The viruses also can spread when a person touches respiratory droplets on another person or an object and then touches their own mouth or nose (or someone else’s mouth or nose) before washing their hands.

Does the flu have complications?

Yes. Some of the complications caused by flu include bacterial pneumonia, dehydration, and worsening of chronic medical conditions, such as congestive heart failure, asthma, or diabetes. Children may get sinus problems and ear infections as complications from the flu.

How soon will I get sick if I am exposed to the flu?

The time from when a person is exposed to flu virus to when symptoms begin is about one to four days, with an average of about two days.  

Prevention and Treatment

  • Get a seasonal flu vaccine.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone

Additional Resources

  • Click here for free printable seasonal flu resources from the CDC.
  • Click here for a CDC toolkit on how to prevent the flu.
  • Federal government's flu page- http://www.flu.gov/

 

Information on this page is from www.cdc.gov

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